Soodeh Tirnaz

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Biography

Soodeh has a Bachelor degree in “Plant Protection” and a master degree in “Plant Biotechnology”. Since moving to Australia in 2013, she has worked as a Graduate Research Assistant at the School of Biological science and ARC centre of excellence in plant energy biology for three years. During that time, she worked on gene expression analysis in canola and genotyping Arabidopsis mutants. She has also been working as a Laboratory Demonstrator in UWA since 2016. She joined Batley’s Lab and started her PhD with Prof. Jaqueline Batley from mid-2016.

Research Interests

Epigenetic, Genomics, DNA methylation, Gene expression, Plant-pathogen interaction, Resistance Genes

Current Projects

Genome-wide identification of disease resistance gene analogs in the Brassicaceae and characterisation of their DNA methylation status in Brassica napus 

The Brassicaceae family consists of a wide range of species, including important crop species from the Brassica genus, such as B. napus (canola). The production of crop species from the Brassicaceae is severely affected by the blackleg disease, caused by Leptosphaeria maculans. Plants employ resistance gene analogs (RGAs) to defeat pathogens. Nucleotide binding-site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR), receptor-like kinases (RLK) and receptor-like proteins (RLP) are the main types of RGAs. Under stress conditions, the expression pattern of defence genes, including RGAs, is changed by epigenetic changes, including but not limited to DNA methylation and demethylation. As these changes can have a major impact on plants adaptation and plant resistance responses. The aim of my PhD project is genome-wide identification of RGAs on different species of the Brassicaceae family and investigating their evolution in this plant family. In addition, I will investigate the genome-wide DNA methylation changes in Brassica napus cultivars in response to the pathogen (i.e L. maculans) attack and their role in resistance response. The outcome of my project will provide a novel source of RGAs in the Brassicaceae and revealing the new aspect of plant-pathogen interaction and all together will help breeders toward resistance improvement.

Publications

Journal publication

1. Hurgobin B, Golicz A, Bayer P, Chan K, Tirnaz S, Dolatabadian A, Schiessl S, Samans B, Montenegro J, Parkin I, Pires J.C, Chalhoub B, King G, Snowdon R, Batley J and Edwards D. 2017. Homoeologous exchange is a major cause of gene presence/absence variation in the amphidiploid Brassica napus. Plant Biotechnology Journal 16: 1265-1274

2. Alamery S, Tirnaz S, Bayer P, Tollenaere R, Chaloub B, Edwards D and Batley J. 2017. Genome-wide identification and comparative analysis of NBS-LRR resistance genes in Brassica napus. Crop and Pasture Science 69: 79-93.

3. Bayer P, Golicz A, Tirnaz S, Chan K, Edwards D and Batley J. 2018. Variation in abundance of predicted resistance genes in the Brassica oleracea pan-genome. Plant Biotechnology Journal In Press (accepted September 2018)

4. Sanjari S, Shobbar Z.S, Ebrahimi M, Hasanloo T, Sadat-Noori S.A, Tirnaz S. Chalcone synthase genes from milk thistle (Silybum marianum): isolation and expression analysis. 2015. Journal of Genetics, 94: 611-617.

5. Tirnaz S, Shobbar Z.S, Mohamadi-Nejad G, Shahidi Bonjar G.H. Gene expression analysis of OsPP2C5, a candidate protein phosphatase involved in ABA signal transduction, under salt, drought and cold stress in rice. 2009. Journal of Agricultural Biotechnology. 1: 67-78.

Conference Papers:

1. Chen, Tirnaz S., Guo Y, Sirault X, Stefanova K, Nelson M.N., Turner N.C, Salisbury P.A, Furbank R, Siddique K.M.H, Cowling W.A. (2014), “Drought and heat tolerance in Brassica rapa and B. napus at the early reproductive stage”, 18th Australian Research Assembly on Brassicas, Novotel Barossa Valley Resort, SA. 29 September-2 October 2014.

2. Chen S, Tirnaz S, Guo Y, Sirault X, Stefanova K, Nelson M.N, Turner N.C, Salisbury P.A, Furbank R., Siddique K.M.H, Cowling W.A. (2014), “Characterization of drought and heat tolerance in Brassica rapa and Brassica napus at the early reproductive stage,” The 19th Crucifer Genetics Workshop and Brassica, Wuhan, China.

3. Tirnaz S, Shobbar, Z.S, Mohamadi-Nejad, Koobaz P, Shahidi Bonjar, G.H. (2009), “Detection of OsPP2C5 gene expression, a protein phosphatase interfering in signalling ABA, under drought, salinity and cold stress in rice,” The 6th National Biotechnology Congress of Iran, Tehran, Iran.

4. Tirnaz S, Shobbar, Z.S, Mohamadi-Nejad G, Shahidi Bonjar, G.H. (2009), “Study of osmotic (salinity) stress effects on sodium and potassium ion uptake in different rice genotypes,” The Second Biotechnology Congress of Iran, Kerman, Iran.

5. Inturrisi F.C, Tirnaz S, Bayer P.B, Neik T.X, Yang H, Dolatabadian A, Zhang F, Severn-Ellis A, Patel D.A, Pradhan A, Lee H.T, Edwards D. and Batley J. Genome-Wide Analysis of NBS-LRR Genes in the Brassicaceae and Applications for Breeding. PAG XXVI. 2018.

6. Tirnaz S, Bayer P.E, Severn-Ellis A, Edwards D and Batley J. Genome-wide identification of disease resistance genes in the Brassicaceae and characterisation of their DNA methylation status in Brassica napus. International plant epi/genetics symposium, Angers, France, 2018.

7. Tirnaz S, Bayer P.E, Severn-Ellis A, Edwards D and Batley J. Genome-wide identification of disease resistance genes in the Brassicaceae and characterisation of their DNA methylation status in Brassica napus. Brassica 2018. meeting.

8. Tirnaz S, Bayer P.E, Edwards D and Batley J. Genome-wide identification of disease resistance genes in the Brassicaceae. Stromlo meeting, Canberra, Australia, 2018 .

Contact Details

Soodeh Tirnaz

Room 1.122, School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science

The University of Western Australia

Crawley, WA 6009, Perth, Australia

Email: soodeh.tirnaz@research.uwa.edu.au

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